Bug Off!

I have been having the worst time with pests in the garden lately! Any organic gardener will occasionally have to deal with a pest infestation, but things have been crazy lately. It all started with something as simple and seemingly harmless as a hummingbird feeder, and let to a very frustrating domino effect.

I started out hanging up a pretty blown glass hummingbird feeder on a shepherd’s hook, near some of my roses. We already get tons of hummingbirds and butterflies in our garden because of the flowers I have planted, but I wanted to try to lure them a bit closer to E’s play house so he could see the hummingbirds a bit closer. After filling the feeder up and letting it hang for half a day, I came out later that evening and realized the feeder had an awful design and had slowly leaked the sticky syrup all over my roses. I tried to rinse the syrup off the roses, but it was a pretty impossible task.

Sure enough, by the next day, the area was swarming with wasps, coming in for the easy snack of that sweet syrup that was now all over my roses. We cannot seem to find a wasp nest anywhere on our property, so I have no idea where they were coming from. I used a store-bought wasp trap in the past (when we didn’t realize we had a wasp nest at our old house), and that thing caught zero wasps. I looked online and read that you can use savory lures to trap wasps, such as tuna or meat, which won’t interest honey bees (I definitely don’t want to kill off all of the beneficial, non-violent pollinators that are so essential to a successful garden!). I put together a trap with some tuna and water. You can make a trap by cutting open a plastic bottle, and turning the top inside the bottom like a funnel, taping the two pieces together. A lot of those things that you read on Pinterest are flat-out lies. Tuna DID NOT LURE ANY WASPS! It did however give us a temporary fly infestation and a horrible stench, both of which were really fun to deal with.

Next, I tried another bottle lure with some fermented honey. I read from a more reliable source that you can take one part honey and one part water, mix them and let it sit for 24 hours to create fermented honey. The mixture will attract wasps but honey bees will have no interest in it. That trapped four wasps, but did not really make a dent in the overall numbers.

By now, the stupid syrup on my roses had trapped a bunch of moisture on the rose leaves, bringing on a bad case of white powdery mildew. I always water my roses just at the root base, early in the morning to prevent getting powdery mildew, so it was pretty disappointing. I have started treating the mildew with neem oil (great for so many uses in organic gardening). If you are unfamiliar with neem oil, it is an organic oil made from a tree nut, and is used for pest control and disease treatment. It is available diluted or in the pure, concentrated formula. I use the pure neem oil, dilute it down, and put it in one of those big sprayers that you carry over your shoulder. Never use it undiluted since it will be too harsh for your plants undiluted.

powder1

I started getting frustrated with the lack of results from my wasp trapping experiments, and went on Amazon and ordered a couple of Waspinators (found here). They are designed to look like a wasp nest and scare off wasps since most types of wasps are territorial and won’t hang out where they think another nest is already located. The first few days, I was pretty angry. I didn’t see a bit of difference. The wasps were happily flying all around the Waspinators. However, the past few days, I haven’t seen any wasps suddenly. I am not sure if the neem oil has countered the syrup enough so now the wasps are no longer interested, or if they eventually got scared off by the Waspinators. I am going to be keeping a close eye on things, but I think we may be in the clear! I am very relieved since I am highly allergic to wasp stings! I don’t know for sure that the Waspinators did the trick, but if you have a wasp problem and no nest in sight, it may be worth a try!

Below, this is where the hummingbird feeder originally hung. Now the Waspinator is hanging there.

wasps

Another frustrating discover that I found yesterday morning was an infestation of black aphids on one area of my nasturtium flowers. 😦 I treated them with a heavy spray of neem oil as well. E and I are crazy about these edible flowers, so I may have gone a bit overboard in planting them. They are starting to take over the back garden, and I may need to thin them out a bit anyway. They never got this large where I planted them in our front garden or at our old house! The difference in the micro-climate from our front yard and our back yard is pretty remarkable…the front yard has shade from the pine trees, the ocean breeze, and the backyard has no shade (yet) and gets extra hot from the way the cement retaining walls trap the heat.

aphids1
aphids2

The most frustrating pest experience of the week was with my little tomato seedlings in my greenhouse. I saw a bunch of grasshoppers one day, and the next day, all 30 of my seedlings were completely gone. I have had the greenhouse partially open so it doesn’t get too hot in there. Those things are voracious eaters, especially with veggies! 😦

Plants Are Like People…They Can Get Sunburnt Too!

When planning a garden, timing is crucial. It is important to plant in early spring or fall so that the plants can establish themselves before dealing with any extremes in heat or cold. The past couple of months, I haven’t done too much blogging since I have been so busy trying to make sure all of our new plants are comfortable in their new environment. With the exception of just a few plants, I selected only things that are very drought tolerant since we are in Los Angeles (we are currently in the middle of a really bad drought here in Southern California).

This week has had extreme temperatures here in L.A., definitely way out of the normal range for spring. Hot even compared to our normal summer temperatures. Like 105 degrees in the shade, just a few miles from the ocean kind of heat. Some of my plants were definitely not ready for this kind of heat. Yesterday was the worst heat all week, and when I went outside in the evening, a lot of my new plants were wilting and looking quite miserable. The nasturtiums in specific surprised me the most…some of them literally got burnt to a crisp! I was surprised since nasturtiums grow wild here along most of the horse trails nearby. However, we don’t normally get that kind of extreme desert heat here!

aliciainwonderlandblog.com

Some of my sun-loving succulents also got a bit crispy as well. 😦

aliciainwonderlandblog.com

This one surprised me the most…I moved most of my houseplants out of the living room so I could keep the dark drapes closed and keep as much heat out of the house as possible. I relocated all of my houseplants to our two patios so they would still be able to get some sun. These jade plants were placed in the south facing, covered patio and got pretty burnt. I guess the change was too much for them since they had been indoors previously. My outdoor jade plants are all doing okay.

aliciainwonderlandblog.com

Last night, after seeing how droopy everything had gotten, I gave everything a good deep watering, and I mixed up a super-revive solution for all of our new plants. I made a diluted mixture of compost tea, seaweed emulsion, fish emulsion, and expired breastmilk that had to be cleaned out from the freezer anyway. I know it sounds crazy, but expired breastmilk does wonders for wilting and depressed plants! It is packed full of nutrients, and whenever I have some to spare, I feed it to whichever plants are most in need of a pick-me-up! This morning, everything looked much better (minus the crispy bits). 🙂

And just for fun, here’s our little cutie, trying to stay cool inside the house. 🙂
aliciainwonderlandblog.com